apartment, landlord, property management, real estate

Satellite Dishes

Question: I ordered satellite service for my apartment, but the landlord refused to let me have the dish installed. How can I persuade him to change his mind?

Answer: The Federal Communications Commission has done the work for you, enacting a detailed set of rules and regulations in 1996 that on many levels prohibit a property owner from restricting a tenant’s right to satellite service. Unfortunately, many people are in the dark about the FCC’s elaborate guidelines. If it’s a dish or antenna you desire, it’s worth researching.

OTARD guidelines are complete but complex.  Here are some points:  The rules define a “dish” antenna as being 1 meter (39.37 inches) or less in diameter (or any size dish if it’s in Alaska).

The satellite dish can be installed almost anywhere within the rented space. Balconies are a popular hangout for satellite dishes, but the landlord can refuse to allow the dish to hang off the balcony in any manner. They can also restrict you from drilling into the exterior walls, or into any common-area location, including the roof.

Unfortunately the location of the dish can make or break a signal. Because sky satellites are only in the Southern Hemisphere, most individual dishes must have southern exposure, which in some cases can be a problem.

Because the OTARD rule prohibits restrictions that can impair a person’s ability to install, maintain or use an antenna, can the landlord actually disallow the dish on the roof? According to the OTARD guidelines, yes.

The property owner does not have to allow the dish in or on common-area locations.

Genuine safety concerns for the tenants or the rental property can also restrict some of the satellite installation sites, such as in narrow hallways or fire-escape routes. Concerns have to be legitimate and apply to all installations.

The installation rules must be provided in written form to the tenant, so the consumer wanting the service understands which safety restrictions apply and why.

Because OTARD is a federal law, it overrides any local or state laws, including the requirement to obtain a permit before the dish is installed.

Questions: FCC toll free at (888) 225-5322. The satellite company provider may also provide some assistance.

http://www.fcc.gov/guides/over-air-reception-devices-rule

http://articles.latimes.com/2006/feb/12/realestate/re-rental12

 

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landlord, property management

Service Pets, pt 2

Here is an update on an earlier post: Coming to a landlord near you.

A friend was sitting at a park and overheard this conversation:

I’m sitting at the playground listening to a lady breathlessly describing how she’s going to get around HUD no-pet rules just as you described with a note from her doctor saying the animal is for “emotional support” because the woman is OUT of WORK!!!

Like I said, get ready.  Everyone is going to have a “service pet”.

 

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apartment, Business, landlord

Landlord with a sledgehammer

EXCLUSIVE: Landlord accused of trashing apartments to boot rent-regulated tenants hit with subpoena by Gov. Cuomo

The state Tenant Protection Unit served the subpoena Wednesday on JBI Management, whose principals Joel and Aaron Israel own 10 buildings in gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhoods. Tenants complained to the unit that workers entered their apartments to do repairs — only to use sledgehammers to destroy kitchens and bathrooms.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Thursday, April 24, 2014, 2:30 A.M.
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiPEARL GABEL/PEARL GABEL/ NEW YORK DAILY NEWSOfficials say a Brooklyn landlord is trashing their own apartments in order to drive out rent-regulated tenants such as Gloria Corea (seated), her daughter Noelia Calero and daughter’s husband Rolando Calero. The kitchen and bathroom of their apartment have been damaged and permanently blocked off with the wall behind them.

A Brooklyn landlord who officials say is deliberately trashing apartments to drive out rent-regulated tenants was hit with a subpoena Wednesday by the Cuomo administration.

The state Tenant Protection Unit served the subpoena on JBI Management, whose principals Joel and Aaron Israel own 10 buildings in gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhoods.

Tenants complained to the unit that workers entered their apartments to do repairs — only to use sledgehammers to destroy kitchens and bathrooms.

The Caleros, who have lived at 98 Linden St. in Bushwick for 23 years, say they’re one of those families.

Read More: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/exclusive-landlord-accused-trashing-apartments-boot-tenants-hit-subpoena-article-1.1767011

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apartment, real estate

Keep your security deposit

Keep your security deposit: 6 tips

Make note of these safeguards to ensure you get your money back when you move out.

By Paula Pant of Trulia

Keep your security deposit: 6 tips (© Epoxydude/Getty Images)

© Epoxydude/Getty Images

 

Do you want to pay an extra one or two months’ rent? Of course not!.

But your security deposit probably represents one to two month’s rent, and countless renters never see that money again. (Bing: Why do renters pay a deposit?)

Here are six tips to avoid losing thousands to lost security deposits.

1. Take photos or video at move-in
The first step to protecting your deposit happens at move-in. Walk through the unit with your landlord and take photos or video of every nook and cranny. Your photos should depict the space at the “macro” level (full rooms) as well as the “micro” level (get close-ups of any existing damage.)

Email the files to your landlord on the same day, so that you both have digital, time-stamped documentation of the condition of the property at move-in. If the video files are too large to email, send it to your landlord via a file-storage website or upload it to a video site as a private video.

Your landlord will appreciate this gesture, as you both share the same goal: You both want solid documentation during move-in so that you won’t get into a brawl during move-out. Your landlord wants the property restored to its move-in condition, so the more you can “prove” that move-in condition, the better — for both of you.

Read More: http://realestate.msn.com/keep-your-security-deposit-6-tips

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real estate

Crack in the Real Estate Foundation

Rising Home Prices Crack Foundation of U.S. Real-Estate Recovery

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Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

A potential home buyer views a model home in San Ramon, California, on Jan. 24, 2014.

A crack is starting to form in the foundation of the U.S. housing-market recovery that extends beyond bad winter weather.

“A rise in interest rates, combined with the rise in home prices, has quickly and surprisingly made a lot of markets unaffordable for home buyers,” saidDaren Blomquist, vice president at property-data firm RealtyTrac Inc. in Irvine, California.

Sales of new homes slumped 14.5 percent to a 384,000 annualized pace, the weakest since July, Commerce Department data showed today in Washington. Purchases fell in three of four regions, including a 16.7 percent decline in the West to the lowest level since January 2012.

Read More: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-23/rising-home-prices-crack-foundation-of-u-s-real-estate-recovery.html

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apartment, property management, real estate

Luxury apartments in Queens

Queens

EXCLUSIVE: Woodside luxury building full of tenants in only 6 weeks

Modern Spaces sells out 66 units at double the neighborhood average

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Monday, April 14, 2014, 5:23 PM
  • Modern Spaces completely leased out the Icon52 on Queens Blvd. in Woodside in just 6 weeks on the market.MODERN SPACESModern Spaces completely leased out the Icon52 on Queens Blvd. in Woodside in just 6 weeks on the market.

THAT was fast.

Woodside’s first luxury apartments filled up after a breezy six weeks on the market, the Daily News has learned.

Tenants willing to fork over sky-high rents that are double the neighborhood average signed leases for all 66 units in the 12-floor Icon52 at 52-05 Queens Blvd.

: The Icon52 offers tenants in its 66 studio through two bedroom apartments a large balcony area with views of the Manhattan skyline.The Icon52 offers tenants in its 66 studio through two bedroom apartments a large balcony area with views of the Manhattan skyline.

Studios at the red brick building start at $1,500 per month and two-bedrooms shoot up to $2,600, or about $41 per square foot — far more than the $18 to $22 per square foot most rentals in the neighborhood command, said Eric Benaim, CEO of brokerage Modern Spaces, which listed the building.

The building, designed by Todd Ernst, is the first luxury development to spring up in Woodside — perhaps the next frontier for developers who were late to capitalize on the boom in Long Island City and Astoria.

: The Icon52, completed in 2013, is the first luxury building in Woodside, according to Long Island City-based Modern Spaces.MODERN SPACESThe Icon52, completed in 2013, is the first luxury building in Woodside, according to Long Island City-based Modern Spaces.

“It definitely shows a new trend,” said Benaim. “Everyone who’s getting priced out of those other areas, I see them looking at this neighborhood as cheaper to develop on.”

The Tsilo Group developed the building, which boasts onsite parking and a rooftop lounge.

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apartment, landlord, property management, real estate

Who does your repairs

Owner: “I could do the repairs myself for a lot less than you are charging.”

Manager: “I’m sure you can.  You are welcome to do the repairs if you want.”

Owner: “I have a guy who will do the work for less than half of what you are charging but I have to oversee him and pickup his supplies.”

Manager: “You are welcome to use him.”

Owner: “But I live 3 hours away.  It’s a hassle to come down there and take care of it.”

Manager: “Yes, I can imagine that would be.”

Owner: “I just don’t like paying your prices.  They are too high.”

Manager: “How much is your time worth to drive 3 hours each way to oversee a guy painting your apartment and picking up paint for him?”

 

I hear this constantly.  This morning as a matter of fact.  You can’t have it both ways.  I don’t change the oil in my car – I pay someone to do it for a lot more than I could do it on my own.  I don’t want the mess, hassle and work involved with changing my oil.  I’m happy that someone will do it for me.

A landlord has a choice – take time out of their schedule to do the work or pay someone to do the work.  It’s their choice.  A manager can lay out the options but can’t be expected to do the work for free.

http://www.amazon.com/Why-Dont-Invest-Real-Estate-ebook/dp/B00E3CD7D8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1396153224&sr=8-2&keywords=brian+fulmer

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